Оскар Уайльд
Портрет Дориана Грея / The Picture of Dorian Gray (+ аудиоприложение)

Портрет Дориана Грея / The Picture of Dorian Gray (+ аудиоприложение)
Oscar Wilde

Bilingua (АСТ)
Перед вами всемирно известный роман Оскара Уайльда «Портрет Дориана Грея», рассказывающий о юноше, который в погоне за вечной молодостью потерял собственную личность. Текст произведения адаптирован и снабжен параллельным переводом на русский язык. Для проверки понимания прочитанного в книге даны упражнения с ответами и англо-русский словарь.

Английский текст полностью озвучен носителями языка и бесплатно доступен для прослушивания на официальном сайте издательства АСТ в разделе «Читальня».

Пособие адресовано всем, кто изучает английский язык и хочет читать литературу на языке оригинала.

Оскар Уайльд / Oscar Wilde

Портрет Дориана Грея / The Picture of Dorian Gray (+ аудиоприложение)

Адаптация текста, перевод, упражнения и словарь С. А. Матвеева

© ООО «Издательство АСТ», 2020

Дорогие друзья!

Как известно, лучший способ учить иностранный язык – это читать художественную литературу. Но чтение должно быть не только полезным, но и увлекательным. Поэтому мы отобрали для вас лучшие произведения мировой литературы. В книгах серии Bilingua вы найдёте адаптированные тексты произведений на английском языке с параллельным переводом на русский. В дополнение к текстам даются упражнения на понимание прочитанного с ответами и англо-русский словарь, в котором вы можете уточнить значение конкретного слова.

Все английские тексты озвучены носителями языка и совершенно бесплатно доступны для прослушивания на официальном сайте издательства АСТ. Чтобы воспользоваться бесплатным аудиоприложением, необходимо:

• зарегистрироваться в разделе «Читальня» на официальном сайте издательства АСТ

(https://ast.ru/reading-room/),

• перейти в каталог «Аудиоматериалы»,

• выбрать нужный аудиокурс.

После этого вы сможете совершенно бесплатно прослушивать аудиоприложение онлайн или скачать на своё устройство и использовать без подключения к Интернету.

Желаем успехов!

Chapter 1

The studio was filled with the rich smell of roses. Lord Henry Wotton was sitting on the divan and smoking innumerable cigarettes. Through the open door came the distant sounds of the London streets.

In the centre of the room stood the full-length portrait of a young man of extraordinary personal beauty, and in front of it, some little distance away, was sitting the artist himself, Basil Hallward.

As the painter looked at the gracious and comely form he had so skilfully mirrored in his art, a smile of pleasure passed across his face. He suddenly started up, and closing his eyes, placed his fingers upon the lids.

“It is your best work, Basil, the best thing you have ever done,” said Lord Henry. “You must certainly send it next year to the Grosvenor. The Academy is too large and too vulgar.

The Grosvenor is really the only place to exhibit a painting like that.”

“I don’t think I shall send it anywhere,” the painter answered, moving his head in that odd way that used to make his friends laugh at him at Oxford. “No, I won’t send it anywhere.”

Lord Henry elevated his eyebrows and looked at him in amazement through the thin blue wreaths of smoke. “Not send it anywhere? My dear fellow, why? What odd people you painters are! A portrait like this would set you far above all the young men in England.”

“I know you will laugh at me,” Basil replied, “but I really can’t exhibit it. I have put too much of myself into it.”

Lord Henry stretched himself out on the divan and laughed. “Too much of yourself in it! Upon my word, Basil, this man is truly beautiful. Don’t flatter yourself, Basil: you are not in the least like him.”

“You don’t understand me, Harry,” answered the artist. “I know that perfectly well. Indeed, I should be sorry to look like him. I am telling you the truth. It is better not to be different from other people. The stupid and ugly have the best of this world. Dorian Gray —”

“Dorian Gray? Is that his name?” asked Lord Henry walking across the room towards Basil Hallward.

“Yes, that is his name. I didn’t intend to tell it to you.”

“But why not?”

“Oh, I can’t explain. When I like people immensely, I never tell their names to any one. When I leave town now I never tell my people where I am going. If I did, I would lose all my pleasure. It is a silly habit, I dare say. I suppose you think that’s very foolish?”

“Not at all,” answered Lord Henry, “not at all, my dear Basil. You seem to forget that I am married, so my life is full of secrets, I never know where my wife is, and my wife never knows what I am doing. When we meet we tell each other the most absurd stories with the most serious faces.”

“I hate the way you talk about your married life, Harry,” said Basil Hallward, walking towards the door that led into the garden. “I believe you are really a very good husband, but that you are ashamed of it. You are an extraordinary fellow. You never say a good thing, and you never do a wrong thing. Your cynicism is simply a pose.”

“Being natural is simply a pose,” cried Lord Henry, laughing; and the two young men went out into the garden together. After a pause, Lord Henry pulled out his watch.

“I am afraid I have to go, Basil,” he said in a quiet voice. “But before I go I want you to explain to me why you won’t exhibit Dorian Gray’s picture. I want the real reason.”

“I told you the real reason.”

“No, you did not. You said that it was because there was too much of yourself in it. Now, that is childish.”

“Harry,” said Basil Hallward, looking him straight in the face, “every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not the sitter. The reason I will not exhibit this picture is that I am afraid that I have shown in it the secret of my own soul.”

Lord Henry laughed. “And what is that?” he asked.

“Oh, there is really very little to tell, Harry,” answered the painter, “and I am afraid you will hardly understand it. Perhaps you will hardly believe it.”

Lord Henry smiled and picked a flower from the grass. “I am quite sure I’ll understand it,” he replied, staring at the flower, “and I can believe anything.”

“The story is simply this,” said the painter. “Two months ago I went to a party at Lady Brandon’s. After I had been in the room for about ten minutes, I suddenly realized that someone was looking at me. I turned around and saw Dorian Gray for the first time. When our eyes met, I felt the blood leaving my face. I knew that this boy would become my whole soul, my whole art itself. I grew afraid and turned to quit the room.”

“What did you do?”

“We were quite close, almost touching. Our eyes met again. I asked Lady Brandon to introduce me to him. It was simply inevitable.”

“What did Lady Brandon say about Mr. Dorian Gray?”

“Oh, something like ‘Charming boy. I don’t know what he does – I think he doesn’t do anything. Oh, yes, he plays the piano – or is it the violin, dear Mr. Gray?’ Dorian and I both laughed and we became friends at once.”

“Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for a friendship,” said the young lord, picking another flower, “and it is the best ending for one.”

Hallward shook his head. “You don’t understand what friendship is, Harry. Everyone is the same to you.”